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Corrosion Control

Corrosion Control Everybody is familiar with the results of the corrosion on metals which are observable as red-brown or green-blue rust (iron oxide). The actual process of corrosion is less noticeable and research still conducted today for better understanding of the mechanisms and how to control it. Although corrosion engineers faced with a difficult challenge, there are several tools that can be implemented in the corrosion control designs, including: Design of Structure Corrosion Inhibitors Material Selection Cathodic Protection Alteration of the Environment Protective Coatings Design of Structure How a structure is designed can influence its resistance to corrosion. Generally speaking, corrosion control designs: Eliminate possible entrapment of water, chemical salts and other matter that could promote corrosion “hot spots”. Hot spots are areas particularly conducive to accelerated corrosion, and are often referred to as “critical areas”. Eliminate complex shapes like back to back angles and orientation of members that could […]

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Types of Corrosion

Types of Corrosion Corrosion manifests in a number of different forms depending on a variety of factors. There are two types of corrosion that include the forms of corrosion that occur on metals: general and localized. General Corrosion One of the types of corrosion results in a relatively uniform loss of material over an entire area and in a general thinning of that affected area and called general or uniform corrosion. General corrosion is relatively easy to detect and its effects predictable unless the affected area is hidden from sight. Cast irons and steels corrode uniformly when exposed to open atmospheres, soils and natural waters, leading to the rusty appearance. In some cases the rich color hues generated from general corrosion are integrated in architectural designs such building facades and outdoor sculptures. Localized Corrosion Localized corrosion occurs at discrete sites on the metal surface. The areas immediately adjacent to the localized […]

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Factors that affect the rate of corrosion

Factors that affect the rate of corrosion Four elements need to be present for corrosion to occur and collectively referred to as the corrosion cell: an anode (+), a cathode (-), a metallic conductor and an electrolyte. Changing the potency of the electrolyte affects the rate of corrosion. Corrosion rates are determined by a variety of factors; however, five factors do play an overwhelmingly important role in determining corrosion rates. Oxygen: Like water, oxygen increases the rate of corrosion. Corrosion can take place in an oxygen-deficient environment, but the rate of the corrosion reaction (and destruction of the metal) is generally much slower. In immersed conditions, if an electrolyte is in contact with one area of metal containing more oxygen than the electrolyte in contact with another area of the metal, the higher oxygen-concentration area is cathodic relative to the remaining surface. An oxygen concentration cell then forms, which results […]

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Why Metals Corrode-What is a Corrosion Cell

Why Metals Corrode-What is a Corrosion Cell Everybody is familiar with the results of the corrosion on metals which are observable as red-brown or green-blue rust (iron oxide). The actual process of corrosion is less noticeable and research still conducted today for better understanding of the mechanisms of corrosion and how to control it. Metals in their engineered form are unstable products. What causes them to corrode is a consequence of their process there were subject to become useful engineered products. In order to produce metals, it is necessary to provide a large amount of energy to extract them from the natural occurring minerals and ores in blast furnaces and form them in steel mills. When these metals are exposed to their natural environments they release the energy that stored during their production and revert to their original form which is rust (iron oxide). The amount of energy required and […]

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